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In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Rui Sun, social psychologist and researcher on human social behaviours.

The arrival of Winter in Germany, signalled by cold rain and short days, luckily also coincides with one of the most ‘golden’ times of the year – the Advent season! Found in many large cities across Europe, Christmas Markets, which began in Germany, have become a staple of the Advent season: known for hot drinks, handmade crafts, and glittering, glowing lights, these markets are a beloved and traditional seasonal highlight, brightening the days leading up to Christmas in more than just the literal sense.

In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also just like the number😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Debdatta, applied physicist who is passionate about nano photonics.

In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also just like the number😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Mariagiulia, legal scholar who is passionate about law and human rights.

Last weekend was once again the Day of Peace of Westphalia. We are taking this as an opportunity to present an exciting programme currently in the works: the Münster International Peace Research Initiative (MIPRI). Similar to WiRe, MIPRI aims to promote and bring together international junior researchers. But let’s return briefly to the Day of Peace of Westphalia. What does the day commemorate again?

This entry to the blog was written by Dr. Yamina Saheb, climate mitigation scientist and current WiRe Fellow whose work and research focuses on designing sustainable policies to ensure wellbeing for all within planetary boundaries.

This blogpost is a slightly altered version of the sufficiency section included in the report entitled 1.5-Degree Lifestyles: Towards a Fair Consumption Space for All published by Hot or Cool Institute. Dr. Saheb’s contribution to this report introduces and examines sufficiency practices, which are long-term actions and societal changes driven by non-technological solutions. Sufficiency (in contrast to the want-based efficiency approach to climate policy) focuses on human needs and services required for wellbeing (i.e., housing including thermal comfort, nutrition, mobility…).

Global warming is today’s reality in every region of the planet

Heatwaves, heavy precipitation, agricultural and ecological droughts in some regions, tropical cyclones, as well as reductions in Arctic Sea ice, snow cover and permafrost are unfortunately what 2021 will be remembered for. Changes of the global climate system became indisputable. Extreme weather and climate events driven by human-induced warming of the atmosphere, ocean and land is unequivocal (Masson-Delmotte 2021).  Every region across the planet has experienced in 2021 at least one climate and weather extreme event. The global climate system has changed because of the global warming caused by the continuous increase of greenhouse gas emissions driven by human activities. Carbon dioxide emissions, resulting from the use of fossil fuels, is the main greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. Over the period 1750-2019, global carbon dioxide concentration increased by 48% to 410 ppm (parts per million) (Global Carbon Budget 2021) leading to an increase of global surface temperature of 1.09°C compared to the pre-industrial temperature levels (Masson-Delmotte 2021).

Endometriosis is a common condition where the lining of the uterus grows in other locations, such as the ovaries and the intestines. This disease is extremely painful and often associated with infertility. Despite the high prevalence of the disease (an estimated 10% of women deal with endometriosis during their reproductive years), this condition remains challenging to diagnose and treat. As a result, most treatments for the endometriosis are not curative and have a high number of associated side-effects. Unfortunately, very little is known about the disease at the molecular level, partially due to the lack of suitable experimental models needed to study the disease.

This is where research in bioengineering plays a roll. To provide some insight into this field, we checked in with one of our 2018/2019 WiRe fellows, Dr. Anna Stejskalová, whose research at the University of Münster focused on designing a 3D model of early endometrial lesions.

Call for Applications: WiRe Fellowships for Female Post-Doc Scientists – Apply Now! Remote and on-site options available.

WiRe is a fellowship programme for international female postdoctoral researchers at the University of Münster (WWU) in Germany. Hosted by the WWU’s Welcome Centre, the WiRe programme was founded to help address the unique needs of women in research, with a special focus on female Postdocs who currently find themselves in their ‘Rush Hour of Life’.

For more information regarding the Application Details, please visit http://go.wwu.de/wire. Applicants must be currently residing in the European Union/EFTA States/UK. The application period is open until the 15th of October, 2021.

For insight into what our Female Scientists have worked on so far during their WIRE Fellowships, please dive into our blog at www.wire-wwu.de/